Relayer: A Brief Retrospective

relayer

A visually stunning album cover. Profound and thought-provoking lyrics. Epic instrumentation and vocals. I could be describing almost any progressive rock album of note, but I am specifically referring to the underrated Yes album Relayer in this case. I say underrated because this album, featuring only three songs, all of which are worthy of the designation “progressive,” ended up wedged in between the controversial Tales from Topographic Oceans and the (relatively) lackluster Yes albums of the late 1970s/early 1980s.

First a brief comment on the sleeve design. Roger Dean is an integral part of Yes’ image, and his design for Relayer only bolsters the importance of his role. Inspired by images of war and the Knights Templar, Dean draws the viewer in to a world of fantastical images and drama, as the knights on horseback arrive to do battle with the twin snakes. Before one even listens to the album, he can already grasp its focus and themes: war and peace, victory and hope. Dean can capture in an image what Anderson, Squire, and Howe can capture in music.templar

The three songs are not only well-written, but they are also well-performed. This may seem like an understatement in regards to Yes, but this cannot be said about every song they released. The epic opener Gates of Delirium, inspired by Tolstoy’s even longer epic War and Peace, and featuring superb work on keys and synths from Patrick Moraz on his only Yes album, was best described by Jon Anderson: it is a “war song,” but not one that seeks to explain or denounce war, but rather a song that explores war’s aspects: there is a “prelude, a charge, a victory tune, and peace at the end, with hope for the future.” Sound Chaser, a frenetically paced tune featuring a true guitar solo from Steve Howe, solid drumming courtesy of Alan White, and a sizzling performance on bass guitar from the late, great Chris Squire, allows Yes to explore their jazzier side. The final tune, To Be Over, moves at a more relaxed pace, anchored by Howe’s electric sitar. It is a beautifully straightforward song, and it provides the perfect final touch on a visually and acoustically stunning album.

In sum, Relayer may not be the most renowned album in Yes’ extensive catalogue, but in this reviewer’s humble opinion, it is one of their finest works overall, and one that deserves more attention and respect.

5 thoughts on “Relayer: A Brief Retrospective

  1. Thanks for this retrospective. I really enjoyed it. Relayer has always been my favorite Yes album. I saw Yes several times in the 1970s, including their Relayer tour at the old New Haven Coliseum. I was really happy to recently see the Anderson Ponty Band in NYC, and they performed the final part of The Gates of Delirium (“Soon”) as an encore.

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  2. I didn’t like Relayer much until I heard the Steven Wilson mix. He managed to make it sound much warmer, and now it’s my third-favorite, behind Going For The One and Close To The Edge. Thanks for this review of it.

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  3. Erik Heter

    I have always loved The Gates of Delirium, and think it’s one of the finest (if not the finest) examples of Chris Squire’s bass work (although every member of the band is stellar). I was never crazy, however, about the production/mixing of the original studio version, but think the Steven Wilson remix finally does it justice.

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