Pink Floyd: The Later Years, 1987-2019

Be afraid, Pink Floyd fans — they’re coming for your bank balance!

After 2010’s reworking of their catalog (single-disc Discovery remasters, with Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here and The Wall also released in multi-disc Experience and super-deluxe Immersion sets), followed by 2016’s massive Early Years set, the Floyd is preparing to unleash The Later Years: 1987-2019 this November 29th.  Focusing on albums and shows from after the split with Roger Waters, you may be surprised at what’s included — what’s not — and what it’ll set you back.  But that’s for after the jump …

The Later Years is set to include:

  • 5 CDs that feature:
    • A Momentary Lapse of Reason, remixed and updated (with live keyboard parts by Rick Wright and new drum parts by Nick Mason)
    • The official live album from that era, Delicate Sound of Thunder remixed (on 2 CDs)
    • A CD of Live Recordings from 1987 & 1994 and Unreleased Studio Recordings from 1994
    • The Knebworth Concert 1990
  • 6 Blu-Rays that feature:
    • A Momentary Lapse of Reason, The Division Bell (2014 remix) and the Unreleased Studio Recordings in Hi-Resolution stereo and surround mixes
    • The Delicate Sound of Thunder video, restored and remixed in stereo and surround
    • 1994’s Pulse video, restored and re-edited in stereo and surround
    • Videos of The Venice Concert 1989 (stereo) and Knebworth 1990 (stereo and surround)
    • Unreleased Live Films, Music Videos & Concert Screen Films
    • Documentaries and Unreleased Music, including Ian Emes’ film of The Endless River (in stereo and surround)
  • 5 DVDs which duplicate the material on Blu-Rays 2-6
  • 2 7″ singles of previously unreleased tracks:
    • “Lost for Words” from the Pulse rehearsals
    • “Arnold Layne” from the 2007 Syd Barrett tribute concert
  • A 60-page hardback photo book designed by Aubrey Powell & Peter Curzon (“including many previously unseen images”)
  • Replica programs from 1987, 1989 and 1994
  • A Lyrics Book designed by Aubrey Powell & Peter Curzon
  • Replica memorabilia (tour passes, stickers, posters — but no scarves or marbles)

So to sum up:

  • Only one of the three post-Waters Floyd studio albums on CD (though they’re all there in some form on Blu-Ray)
  • Only one of the two live albums on CD (and the Delicate Sound video features different performances than the CD version)
  • Two new live concerts from the archives on video (one also on CD), along with miscellaneous outtakes
  • DVDs which duplicate the material on the Blu-Rays at lower resolution (effectively making The Later Years an 11-disc set, not a 16-disc one as advertised).  Easier than manufacturing different sets for Blu-Rays and DVDs, I suppose.
  • The spectacular omission (possibly due to rights issues) of the Live 8 reunion

And all for just … $475???!???

Call me cynical, but WHY??  This set costs nearly as much as The Early Years, which included probably twice as much material.  And six months after that big box was released, Pink Floyd broke that set up into six smaller, much more affordable boxes.

It’s tempting to wait for a similar thing to happen with The Later Years.  (Or just pick up the single CD/2 LP sampler that will come out the same day.)  But if the price drops enough … or if I just can’t resist … well, watch this space.

(P.S.  The Later Years will leave Animals and The Final Cut as the only Floyd albums that haven’t received some level of deluxe treatment, although a surround mix of Animals has been rumored for a while.  Maybe they’ll save that for The Middle Years …)

 

— Rick Krueger

5 thoughts on “Pink Floyd: The Later Years, 1987-2019

  1. Michał

    I was super excited when I saw the announcement on Facebook, then looked at the trackilist and… a huge HUGE meh. As one interested in CDs only, I’ll just have to skip. Ok, the remixed Lapse, the rarities CD and the Knebworth concert are all great, but 3 CDs for $475 is not even an overkill, it’s just retarded.

    Pink Floyd are not exactly known for their acumen in vault management, but this is a disaster of a different order of magniture. And I’m not speaking about the era covered as I actually prefer Gilmour-led PF to anything else released post-Meddle. A terrible terrible mess. How does it get approved for release, form a purely business standpoint, I wonder?

    I’m hoping for some sort of Early Years-style division of the package to pick up bits and pieces.

    Well, at least probably the packaging is neat…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. kruekutt

      A big part of Pink Floyd is the packaging, at least since they hit the bullseye with Dark Side. Of course, Robert Fripp might say that they’re “fetishizing the inherent & delineated meanings of the music instead of being present with it” — or words to that effect.

      I’m frankly covetous of both the CDs and the Blu-Rays. And I don’t mind the DVD duplication so much; it’s simpler than issuing separate Blu-Ray and DVD sets and risking consumer confusion.

      But given that the broken-up Early Years boxes cost a couple hundred dollars less than the complete set (admittedly, missing two discs of live tracks including a live “Echoes” and three forgettable movies with Floyd soundtracks),it’s hard not to conclude that PF are asking you to pay a premium for admittedly slick, high-end design work.

      At any rate, I have my contingency plans in place. Now to stick to them!

      Like

      1. Michał

        I will surely buy the highlights CD. I also see that if you are interested in DVDs/BRs more than I am the box is far more worth its price.

        As I love PF packaging, even the lesser designs are very good at the least, I do not mind paying more for “high-end design work”.

        I’m hoping for smaller packages Early Years-style at some point. I guess it will probably depend on the sales.

        I would like to have the live 1974 “Echoes” and “More” (I actually like the movie and the soundtrack is among my PF favourites strangely enough), but luckily I’m very content with my EY purchases, I listen to the CDs quite a lot.

        What I am sorely missing as far as Pink Floyd goes are live releases from 1970-1972, especially those with transitional versions of some pieces. The BBC recordings from 1970 and 1971 as well as AHM without orchestra (on EY) are very nice but this is a hugely underrepresented period in the band’s history. (A live release from any tour not yet released would be great to be honest.)

        As for King Crimson, they are unbeatable curators of their legacy but I do admit that the amount of available material can be overwhelming, especially all the ‘elements’, ‘snippets’, etc. But who am I to complain seeing that I can actually somehow stay very much up to date with all this insanity and rejoice at every announcement of new releases 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I hate it when they do things like this and try and make you pay a stupid ridiculous price for the thing you actually want. For example the only thing that really interests me are the Blu Rays with the 5.1 recordings of Momentary Lapse Of Reason & The Division Bell. The 5.1 concert footage might be good to have too. But the only thing you can ever get your hands on cheaply enough from a box set like this are the remastered CD’s or vinyl albums to which do not interest me at all. They can put them out in an affordable package so why can they not do the same with the 5.1 recordings.

    For example they could put out two individual packages in a Digipak that contains the CD’s and the Blu Ray of each of the 2 albums for around £20 – £30 each like many other artists do. it’s not as if Pink Floyd are skint and need the money. But oh no they expect you go out spend £400 just so you can get your hands what little you want and like to rip you off BIG Style. Well they can kiss my ARSE! and no way could I afford to pay that and even if I could I would have to be a bloody MUG!

    Liked by 1 person

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