Interview with HEYOKA’s MIRROR

Calgary, Canada-based progressive metal act Heyoka’s Mirror has recently returned with the release of a new, instrumental single “Asylum” which is a grand taster for the group’s upcoming full-length album.

Let’s start from your early music beginnings. How did your musical career begin? When did you start playing? Which groups have been your favorites? Please tell us something more about your early life.

Andrew: Omar and I started playing music around the same age. We were 14 and 16. I discovered Dream Theater when I was 14 years old and that’s when I started taking singing and theory lessons. I spent my teenage years listening to bands like Dream Theater, Symphony X, and Transatlantic. 

Omar: Yup, started playing around 16. As a young kid, I was a huge GNR and Metallica fan and always wanted to play like those guys! Then when I picked up the guitar and started learning, I was introduced to music from guys like Eddie Van Halen, Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, John Petrucci, DREAM THEATER (greatest band!), Paul Gilbert, Yngwie J. Malmsteen and the list goes on and on! 

How did you go about starting Heyoka’s Mirror? Who was the most influential when the project started its musical journey?

Andrew: I met Omar in the spring of 2015. I had just moved into Calgary and I was looking for a guitar player for a solo project I had. We met and decided to have a writing session a week after our meeting. That’s when Heyoka’s Mirror started. 

Omar: Just like Andrew said. I was contacted by him through social media, we met and had a quick discussion about the kind of music we both wanted to do and that was it. I remember we discussed how melody is a very important aspect of the kind of music we want to create. 

In the beginning, did you have some “fixed” tempo in composing songs or everything was a product of jamming, improvising?

Andrew: We always write a story first. Once the story is complete, then we start writing the music according to the events in the tale. 

Omar: Story always comes first and then we start creating the music for it. A lot of it just happens bouncing ideas, talking about the story and then trying to communicate those feelings and emotions through our music. 

How would you describe Heyoka’s Mirror music on your own?

Omar: I would say it is a blend of a lot of different styles of music. Our songs and certain parts within them can sound like hard rock, pop, jazz, metal, blues, blues rock. To us, whatever feels right for the story, belongs in the song. Let’s go with Progressive Rock/Metal 🙂

What is the most important thing for the structure of your songs? Is it a riff, a melody line?

Omar: We like to write a story before we write the music. If there is no story, what is the music about? For the album coming up, the whole album is one story (concept album). We go part by part, song by song to create the music for it, while keeping the story in mind and where it is going. For recording, all the drums, vocals and bass are recorded in the studio. Andrew and I record our parts(keys, 8 string guitars, rhythm and lead guitars) at home. 

The most important thing for the structure of the song? I think there are a few things.

Melody is important! Riffs that are heavy and high energy in certain situations. We also like to avoid sounding mechanical. We want the music to be full of life and character! 

Recommend us some good prog metal acts coming from your area.

Andrew: Oh, there are some really good ones! Illuminated Minerva, Metavore, Subsume, and my favorite one… Nok Novum! Those guys are amazing! 

Are you also involved in any other projects or bands beside Heyoka’s Mirror?

Andrew: Not really, I help here and there as a session player, but not really as a full time member.

Omar: No. I play golf in my free time. Golf is the best!

What are your long-term plans for Heyoka’s Mirror?

Andrew: First things first… we need a drummer! Our album was completed with the help of session drummers, but we need someone who would like to join the family. Once we have a drummer, we would like to start going out on little tours. Start expanding. We want Heyoka’s Mirror to eventually get big enough so we can tour around the world (every musician’s dreams pretty much). We would love to play with big bands, play festivals. We just want to get OUT THERE!

“Asylum” is out now; get it from Bandcamp. Follow Heyoka’s Mirror on Facebook.

Review: Heyoka’s Mirror – Loss of Contact with Reality

Heyoka's Mirror - Loss of Contact with Reality

Hailing from Calgary, Alberta in Canada, a progressive metal trio Heyoka’s Mirror has earlier this month launched their debut EP “Loss of Contact with Reality,” available as a name-your-price download and CD from Bandcamp.

“Loss of Contact with Reality” places Heyoka’s Mirror to the art-metal vanguard, but the three-song EP does find the band on surer footing from which to make their next leap forward. The last track in particular, “Chronovisor,” gets surprisingly good mileage from an unlikely source: melodic metal, maybe the least reputable of metal subgenres. It’s the metal niche that has least renounced the campy excesses of new-wave Brit metal a la Iron Maiden and Judas Priest, but it’s also the most melodic, its tell signs being clean-sung harmonies and dramatic synths that tend to blast out from behind the guitars. It turns out the style makes a good segue between the sections of “Chronovisor” that are rooted in math rock and those that are rooted in thrash metal, and the effectiveness with which Heyoka’s Mirror employs those soaring melodies suggests they may yet develop their own mutant pop sensibility.The first two songs are dynamic; they’re also wildly uneven, with very cool ideas alternating, often in rapid succession.

More than anything else, Heyoka’s Mirror is dependent on their ability to generate momentum here, by virtue of which they can keep listeners engaged in these unwieldy but ultimately rewarding compositions. By that standard, “Loss of Contact with Reality” is a success, though its true significance will be determined by how the band capitalizes on that momentum when they come up with their forthcoming full-length.