Remembering the Genius of Porcupine Tree

2018 release
The 2018 release.  2 CD/1 Blu-ray from Kscope.

Porcupine Tree, ARRIVING SOMEWHERE. . . (Kscope, 2018).  2 CD/1 Blu-ray package.  A re-release of the 2007 title on DVD.

Though it originally came out over a decade ago, Porcupine Tree’s ARRIVING SOMEWHERE . . .–its live show from Chicago, October 11-12, 2005–has just been re-released by Kscope in a very nice 2 cd/1 blu-ray book.

When it first came out on DVD in 2007, I had purchased it immediately. Of all the concerts I own on varous forms of video, ARRIVING SOMEWHERE . . . has been in constant play, rivaling only Rush’s TIME MACHINE and Talk Talk’s LIVE IN MONTREUX for most played.

Now, having it on CD and blu-ray reminds me yet again how incredible Porcupine Tree was in the first decade of this millenium. Admittedly, between 2001 and 2010, I was rather obsessed with the band. To me–all pre-2009 and, thus, pre-UNDERFALL YARD–no other band had reached as far and as perceptively as had Porcupine Tree. The band seemed the perfect fusion of prog, pop, and psychedelia–in its music as well as in its lyrics.

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Lee Speaks About Music… #80 — Lee Speaks About…

The Power and The Glory (CD/Blu Ray) – Gentle Giant Introduction… Well I have always liked Gentle Giant since I finally got into them which was a good couple of decades after they disbanded in 1980. I barely took any notice of them back in the 70’s and I am pretty sure it was through […]

via Lee Speaks About Music… #80 — Lee Speaks About…

Cinematic Scores: The Best are Prog

DKRises
Is there any better modern cinematic composer than Hans Zimmer?

I would be stunned to find out that most lovers of prog music don’t also love really artful and meaningful films.

I’m not knocking goofy films.  I love Bowfinger, Old School, etc.: movies my brothers and I lovingly refer to as “great stupid movies.”

And, of course, there are a number of movies that play what my friend, Mike Church, calls “juke box” music–The Wedding Singer or almost any John Hughes movie.

I’m, however, thinking of actual cinematic scores written for the screen.

And, to be fair–and probably state the obvious–many of the best modern soundtracks, such as those by Hans Zimmer–are clearly influenced by prog rock.

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Burning Shed News (May 17, 2018)

 

Paul Draper

Sale (various items)


The first in a series of sales to celebrate 10 years of the Kscope label.

Many Paul Draper items – including the extremely limited limited cassette edition of Spooky Action – will be available at a reduced price until May 31st.

David Bowie

Welcome To The Blackout (Live London ’78) (cd pre-order)


Welcome To The Blackout (Live London ’78) captures Bowie live during the ISOLAR II tour at Earls Court, London on the 30th June and 1st July 1978.

The album was recorded by Tony Visconti and was mixed by David and David Richards at Mountain Studios, Montreux in January 1979.

Initials copies of the CD are packaged in a six-panel digipak with rare photos from Sukita and Chris Walters

Double CD in digipak.

Pre-order for 29th June release.

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Mead Halls in Winter: Big Big Train as Community

Grimspound
Grimspound, 2017.  Art by Sarah Ewing.

One of the wildest and most disturbing aspects of modernity is how compartmentalized everything becomes.  One important thing (a person, an idea, an institution) becomes isolated and, in its isolation, takes on its own importance, its own language (jargon), and, naturally, its own abstraction.

During the past 100 years, a number of groups have tried to combat this.  In the U.K., most famously, there were a variety of literary groups: The Inklings; the Bloomsbury Group; and the Order Men.  In the States, there were the southern Agrarians, the Humanists, the Lovecraftians, and the women (no official name–but Isabel Patterson, Claire Boothe Luce, Dorothy Thompson, and Rose Wilder Lane) who met for tea once a week and shared stories.

The first such known group in the English-speaking group was the Commonwealth Men, meeting in London taverns from 1693 to 1722, attempting to combine British Common Law thinking with classical and ancient philosophy.

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