Interview with KRISHNA PERI

Krishna Peri

Dallas based guitarist, producer and songwriter Krishna Peri is about to launch his debut album “Across the Horizon” on August 15th, a release where the musician explores different music styles and adapting them to his own experimental formula.

Peri spoke for Progarchy about the album, but also his influences, writing process, and more.

What made you decide to release “Across the Horizon” under your own name? Does it feel more personal that way?

I am like a musical sponge and I like to absorb different genres that I come across, whether it is metal or anything else. I felt like if I am playing in a band, I have to stick to one particular style, for example, if you play in a death metal band, you can only play that and can’t really add extra quirkiness to it. Of course, I do enjoy playing in a band like that too but as an independent artist, I felt like I can touch base on multiple sounds and it would still be acceptable.

How do you usually describe your music?

I try to do two things – play heavy, memorable riffs but at the same time, focus on the underlying melody. To me, melodic playing and attention to the notes goes a long way and I try to incorporate the same in my music.

Across the Horizon

What is your writing process like?

I usually have a bunch of demos recorded on my phone, whenever I am just in a relaxed leisure mood. I would go back and listen to these raw clips from time to time whenever I need some inspiration. Once I find the right one, I create a session in my DAW, program the drums and lay down the guitar parts. By this point, the song starts taking its shape. Once finished, I send the demos to my drummer and bassist, who listen to it with a fresh pair of ears and give their comments. Once we polish the whole thing, the final drums are recorded in a studio. And then, I lay down my guitar tracks in my home studio. Last step would be sending these stems to the bassist, who does his part. I look over certain things from a producer’s perspective like, if the song needs any additional layers, keys etc. Finally, the whole thing gets mixed and mastered.

Who or what is your inspiration, if you have any?

Joe Satriani, Marty Friedman, Dimebag Darrell, Plini, Nick Johnston and John Petrucci – these are my main influences when it comes to instrumental music and soloing.

What is your favourite piece on the upcoming album and why?

“Stained Glass Memory” is my most favorite song on this album because it has these ambient sections followed by crushing heavy parts. The entire song jumps back and forth from 7/4 to 15/8 to 6/8, which gives it this mystical feeling. We’re working on releasing a music video for this particular track with a concept behind it, so stay tuned for that!

What makes “Across the Horizon” different?

I would say, complex time signatures, intricate solos, solid drumming and bass work, and the exploration of different genres like Viking metal, black metal, death metal etc.

What should music lovers expect from the album?

They should expect some expressive melodic playing. If you are a fan of modern instrumental music like the Intervals or Plini then I guarantee that you would dig it!

What kind of emotions would you like your audience to feel when they listen to your music?

Instrumental music is a tricky market to break in, just because there’s no vocals to convey anything. Which is why, we have to be very diligent in coming up with phrases because the guitar itself is treated like a vocal part. I would want my audience to feel the same thing and enjoy the tension and release of some of the songs that I am trying to present to them.

Pick your three favourite albums that you would take on a desert island with you.

That’s such a difficult question because there’s so many! I’ll try my best – Rust in Peace by Megadeth, Shockwave Supernova by Joe Satriani and Remarkably Human by Nick Johnston.

 

“Across the Horizon” is available on Bandcamp. Follow Peri on Facebook and Instagram.

TELERGY’s Robert McClung Talks New Album “Black Swallow”

“Black Swallow” is the title of the new, fourth studio album by a New Hampshire based progressive rock project Telergy–a brainchild of the award winning, Emmy nominated, Billboard top ten charting composer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist Robert McClung. As is the case with previous efforts, this new offering is another concept album which, this time, tells the story of the first African-American pilot and hero Eugene Bullard.

McClung has once again gathered a team of guest musicians around himself, featuring members and collaborators for historical acts such Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Iced Earth, Styx, Kansas, Foreigner, Trans-Siberian Orchestra, and many more. The album is available for pre-order via the ongoing crowdfunding campaign over at Indiegogo.

In a new interview for Progarchy, McClung discusses “Black Swallow,” but also lets us know about his favorite releases, and more.

You are about to launch a new full-length album with Telergy entitled “Black Swallow.” How do you feel about the release?

I’m delighted. The album has been five long years in the making. It was a massive endeavor with over sixty people involved. We were meticulous to take our time and get it right. It was too important of a story not to. I think we have absolutely made the best Telergy album so far.

How much of a challenge was to work on the album?

The musicians involved with Telergy are spread out all across the world, and some have very busy schedules. Working out all the logistics of getting them into studios to do their parts was quite an undertaking. From a musical perspective, the album had to incorporate elements of certain styles like blues, jazz, gospel and military themes to properly convey the story. Which for me as a composer was a huge challenge to weave into the progressive rock and metal format that Telergy is built upon. But those are the challenges that fuel my creativity with every Telergy album.

Tell me about how you set on making an album about the life of Eugene Bullard, the first African-American pilot in the history of the United States.

I stumbled upon Eugene’s story online shortly after the release of the last Telergy album, Hypatia. The more a dug into it, the more captivating and incredible it was. I was totally baffled that this great hero had existed, but was never mentioned in any American history books. It was a travesty, and I knew I had a chance to use my outlet with Telergy to bring his story out into the light for more people to discover.

What is your opinion about the current progressive rock scene?

There are so many wonderfully talented artists out there right now making some of the best music ever. Older, more established artists and younger, lesser known ones as well. It’s a delightful scene where everyone respects and supports each other like a big family. I only wish it were possible to bring prog back into the mainstream so those artists could get wider attention. The industry has changed so much, across all genres. It’s become nearly impossible for artists to make a living anymore. I hope in the future our society can see more value in the arts and find ways that musicians can support themselves with their music alone.

Can you tell me something about your influences?

My Grandfather was a country musician. He gave me my first guitar when I was around ten years old. I was first inspired by all the classic rock bands of the 70’s that my parents listened to. Pink Floyd, Fleetwood Mac, Aerosmith, Kansas, etc. In my teens I got into heavy metal bands like Metallica and Megadeth. In my teens I also started working in musical theater. Writing and arranging music for shows and performing in pit orchestras. I found that progressive rock blended these two opposing genres of music very well. Bands like Queensryche, Dream Theater, Savatage and Trans-Siberian Orchestra were doing amazing themed albums during that time and I was pulled right in. I feel so fortunate that I now get the chance to work side by side with many of the artists who inspired me when I was young.

What are you listening to these days?

The latest Kansas album is stunning!! They aren’t resting on the laurels of their past hits. They are making some of the best music of their career right now. I’m also totally entranced by Rachel Flowers, who I had the chance to work with on this album. Her talent is amazing, so original and fresh. You can detect her influences, but she blends them into something totally new. I also listen to allot of classical music and movie soundtracks these days. Hans Zimmer is a favorite.

Your five favorite records of all the time?

It’s hard to pick only five. But here goes…

  1. Pink Floyd – The Wall: Hearing the guitar solo on “Another Brick in the Wall Pt. 2” when I was ten years old was a huge turning point for me. I pointed to the record player and proclaimed “I want to do that when I grow up!”. The albums lyrical themes also connect deeply with my own personal life. I had issues with my parents, school, etc. In many ways I felt like Roger Waters was writing about me. The fact that it told a story was so impactful. It wasn’t just a hodge podge of songs about love, politics, partying or whatever. It all fit together in a bigger way and felt so much more emotional and meaningful by doing so. Animals is another Pink Floyd favorite. All their material really. My wife and I actually met on a Pink Floyd fan page.
  2. Kansas – Leftoverture: This was the band that inspired me to play violin. It was through them that I learned that rock music didn’t have to be stuck in a simplistic, repetitive, three chord, one rhythm format. It could twist and turn intricately, just like an orchestra, yet still be powerful and intense. I first met the band after a concert in my teens. They were so friendly and supportive. Their words of encouragement were key to me perusing my own dreams.
  3. Savatage – The Wake of Magellan: A heavy metal album telling the story of a sailor contemplating suicide, who finds new reason for living when he saves a drowning man in the ocean. The mixture of metal and classical music themes was just so powerful, and the story so captivating. I knew I wanted my own music to encompass these elements.
  4. Dream Theater – Metropolis Pt. 2, Scenes from a Memory: This album hit me like a truck!! I had enjoyed all of Dream Theater’s albums prior to this, but this one was a total mind bender. The virtuosity of the music, the depth of the story. It was all just so perfectly done. Total masterpiece!
  5. Trans-Siberian Orchestra – Beethoven’s Last Night: Beethoven tricks the Devil to save his soul and keep his last symphony. Brilliant! When Savatage morphed into Trans-Siberian Orchestra I enjoyed the spectacle of their live shows, but hoped they wouldn’t only do Christmas music. When this album came out, I got everything I wanted. The over the top metal/classical bombast that had drawn me to their music in the first place, and a creative, intense story with a cool twist at the end. Love it!
Notice a connection here? Almost all of these on my list are concept records that tell stories. Which has become the cornerstone of my work with Telergy.

Besides the release of the album, are there any other plans for the future?

I’m regularly asked if Telergy will ever perform live. As much as I would love to see that happen, the logistics and cost of getting that many people together are far beyond my capabilities. But if the right financial backers came along, who knows? I’m always open to the idea. As for the next album, I haven’t found the right story yet. Once I do, I’ll rev up the engines again and see where the ride takes me.

Any words for the potential new fans?

Thank you for giving Telergy some attention. We are delighted to have you onboard. Understand that Telergy is more than just a band. It’s a massive consortium of musicians from all over the world coming together to do something truly unique. We pour our hearts into everything we do, and I hope that passion comes through in the music. We hope we can inform and educate just as much as we entertain.

“Black Swallow” can be pre-ordered via Indiegogo here. Follow Telergy on Facebook.

LEPROUS Drummer BAARD KOLSTAD Talks “Pitfalls,” Band’s Position on the Scene, Rendezvous Point & More

LEPROUS Drummer BAARD KOLSTAD Talks “Pitfalls,” Band’s Position on the Scene, Rendezvous Point & More

Leprous and Rendezvous Point drummer Baard Kolstad did an interview before the Leprous show in Istanbul on February 13th where he talks about the group’s latest effort Pitfalls, the Prog scene, the upcoming edition of the Prognosis Festival in Eindhoven, and more. The full video interview, as well as a few excerpts, can be seen below.

Asked to comment about the new Leprous album being arguably the most dynamic release the band put out to date, Baard said: “We’ve always been suckers for dynamic and whatever is making the right vibe; it that’s to play soft or if it’s to have everything soft but the drums extremely hard. It’s difficult to point out exactly what’s going on when we make very variated album as that, but of course there were some barriers or not barriers, but it was like new Leprous kind of stuff happening. For instance from my point of view as a drummer, when I heard demos for ‘By My Throne’—it’s just like, ‘okay, that’s a new kind of Leprous, let’s make this sound like us and try to put that into the Leprous setting.’”

About whether or not Leprous defy progressive rock and metal conventions with Pitfalls, Kolstad commented: “When I’m searching new music I’m not going only for progressive bands, I’m going for all kinds of music. It doesn’t really matter what it is, but of course we have a background we love, like Opeth and Tool and Dream Theater—not the others but I love Dream Theater—bands like that, Meshuggah. But that’s tools again—not the band Tool—but tools for us to use in composition and musicianship. We don’t try to care much about expectations, but I guess like the way we write or like Einar writes, the way we play will naturally be for people that only play stoner rock. We will always be a prog band, but for the proggers we will probably not be a prog band. And for a pop group we will definitely be proggy or weird or something like that. We kind of don’t belong anywhere.

During the interview Baard also talks about the expectations fans usually have from bands in terms of the sound and musical direction, Leprous’ 20th anniversary next year, the current Rendezvous Point tour with Anathema, drum clinics, his tips for aspiring drummers, and more. Watch the full interview below.

Interview with HEYOKA’s MIRROR

Calgary, Canada-based progressive metal act Heyoka’s Mirror has recently returned with the release of a new, instrumental single “Asylum” which is a grand taster for the group’s upcoming full-length album.

Let’s start from your early music beginnings. How did your musical career begin? When did you start playing? Which groups have been your favorites? Please tell us something more about your early life.

Andrew: Omar and I started playing music around the same age. We were 14 and 16. I discovered Dream Theater when I was 14 years old and that’s when I started taking singing and theory lessons. I spent my teenage years listening to bands like Dream Theater, Symphony X, and Transatlantic. 

Omar: Yup, started playing around 16. As a young kid, I was a huge GNR and Metallica fan and always wanted to play like those guys! Then when I picked up the guitar and started learning, I was introduced to music from guys like Eddie Van Halen, Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, John Petrucci, DREAM THEATER (greatest band!), Paul Gilbert, Yngwie J. Malmsteen and the list goes on and on! 

How did you go about starting Heyoka’s Mirror? Who was the most influential when the project started its musical journey?

Andrew: I met Omar in the spring of 2015. I had just moved into Calgary and I was looking for a guitar player for a solo project I had. We met and decided to have a writing session a week after our meeting. That’s when Heyoka’s Mirror started. 

Omar: Just like Andrew said. I was contacted by him through social media, we met and had a quick discussion about the kind of music we both wanted to do and that was it. I remember we discussed how melody is a very important aspect of the kind of music we want to create. 

In the beginning, did you have some “fixed” tempo in composing songs or everything was a product of jamming, improvising?

Andrew: We always write a story first. Once the story is complete, then we start writing the music according to the events in the tale. 

Omar: Story always comes first and then we start creating the music for it. A lot of it just happens bouncing ideas, talking about the story and then trying to communicate those feelings and emotions through our music. 

How would you describe Heyoka’s Mirror music on your own?

Omar: I would say it is a blend of a lot of different styles of music. Our songs and certain parts within them can sound like hard rock, pop, jazz, metal, blues, blues rock. To us, whatever feels right for the story, belongs in the song. Let’s go with Progressive Rock/Metal 🙂

What is the most important thing for the structure of your songs? Is it a riff, a melody line?

Omar: We like to write a story before we write the music. If there is no story, what is the music about? For the album coming up, the whole album is one story (concept album). We go part by part, song by song to create the music for it, while keeping the story in mind and where it is going. For recording, all the drums, vocals and bass are recorded in the studio. Andrew and I record our parts(keys, 8 string guitars, rhythm and lead guitars) at home. 

The most important thing for the structure of the song? I think there are a few things.

Melody is important! Riffs that are heavy and high energy in certain situations. We also like to avoid sounding mechanical. We want the music to be full of life and character! 

Recommend us some good prog metal acts coming from your area.

Andrew: Oh, there are some really good ones! Illuminated Minerva, Metavore, Subsume, and my favorite one… Nok Novum! Those guys are amazing! 

Are you also involved in any other projects or bands beside Heyoka’s Mirror?

Andrew: Not really, I help here and there as a session player, but not really as a full time member.

Omar: No. I play golf in my free time. Golf is the best!

What are your long-term plans for Heyoka’s Mirror?

Andrew: First things first… we need a drummer! Our album was completed with the help of session drummers, but we need someone who would like to join the family. Once we have a drummer, we would like to start going out on little tours. Start expanding. We want Heyoka’s Mirror to eventually get big enough so we can tour around the world (every musician’s dreams pretty much). We would love to play with big bands, play festivals. We just want to get OUT THERE!

“Asylum” is out now; get it from Bandcamp. Follow Heyoka’s Mirror on Facebook.

KATATONIA’s ANDERS NYSTRÖM on Band’s Comeback: “Our Hunger and Passion Came Back Pretty Quick”

Photo credits: Ester Segarra

KATATONIA’s guitarist Anders Nyström and singer Jonas Renkse talked before the recent show in Izmir, Turkey about their return, the upcoming album City Burials which is out on April 24 via Peaceville Records, among other topics. Watch the full interview below.

Asked about KATATONIA’s return a year after they announced the hiatus, Nyström commented: “The break was something that we really needed to do. We’ve been going for a band since early ‘90s, non stop. With everything you need to step back and sometimes put things into perspective and re-evaluate yourself and everything around you. We needed to do that. Also to try to see where we want to go and also to gain the motivation to continue. It was not a set plan that we need a year. I think our hunger and passion came back pretty quick. It kind of happened to be the anniversary of ‘The Night is the New Day’ album and we felt that it was like a perfect slow comeback thing; nothing too dramatic and it would just make a lot of sense trying things out again and celebrate that album. It actually made things very exciting again. Stepping into that, that way.

KATATONIA returns on April 24 with the release of their 11th studio album City Burials; pre-order it here. The band will play a fan voted by request set at the Prognosis Festival in Eindhoven on March 20.

Watch the interview with Anders and Jonas below.

Review: M-opus – Origins

The very notion of a double album should be enough to make most people giggle a little bit. There are implications of ‘concept album’ and insinuations of ‘prog-rock’ involved in that notion. Neither of these things are not cool, but they encompass exactly what Origins is, and exactly what M-opus do.

After the release of a stunning debut album 1975 Triptych in 2015, which was thought-provoking as it was sonically mesmerising, the Dublin, Ireland trio didn’t take it for granted and rush into a songwriting process for their follow-up.

m-opus_origins

The focus of the band’s attention has shifted somewhat, and although the debut was somewhat concept record, Origins is a piece of work that is entirely based on the story that deals with “redemption and destiny, the fulfillment of potential, through the story of a character who is a genius, but is his own worst enemy; a drunk gambler who is increasingly lost.

Throughout of the album’s 28-track repertoire, you get epic arrangements brought to perfection which are refined through a pleasant filter. Origins intersperses jangled guitars with angular complexities that might fly over some heads – repeat listens are deserved. The songs are organised so intricately that all the nuances and difficulties that might have gone into recording such an extraordinary album are totally lost in its beauty.

At the other end of the spectrum, however, sit songs which will shower the listener with jagged shards of heavy pounding; jagged shards that will bypass your vital organs and instead embed themselves within the deeper, darker echelons of your mind. Some of this album is simply unforgettable.

M-opus really do lead by example: with Origins acting as a fantastic example of how to take inspiration from all the sub-standard facets of day-to-day goings on to create a stunning collection of songs, they’ve proved that not everything in modern life is rubbish.

Follow M-opus on Facebook.

Album Review: LUNAR – Eidolon

Originality is tough in music, and especially so in progressive metal. So many genres have cross-pollinated over the years that trying to put a unique spin on music usually ends up with going so far off the reservation that coherency can be lost. It’s a shame that “progressive” has become a kind of cliche-ridden sound of its own, hence my temptation is to call Eidolon — the second album by Sacramento’s Lunar — a progressive death metal album. Not in the sense that it uses “prog” tropes, but because it genuinely sounds like a forward step in terms of what can be done with death metal.

I’m not often a fan of likening bands to other bands, because I think unless it’s an intentional throwback or copycat it does a disservice, but the first thing that comes to mind is Opeth by way of Fates Warning and I do not say this lightly. Eidolon has an intensity to it that is organically broken up with occasional clean or melodic sections that never sound out of place; the group — brainchild of drummer and songwriter Alex Bosson — never comes across as hokey or gimmicky.

Alex_Bosson
Alex Bosson, founder of Lunar

All right, let’s dig in a bit. The musicianship is as tight as any metal release you’re likely to hear this year or any other year. Every member is on top of their game.  And speaking of members, the core of the group is comprised of singer Chandler Mogel, bassist Ryan Price, and guitarist Balmore Lemus, along with already mentioned Bosson on drums. Eidolon also features guest contributions from members of Haken, Leprous, Thank You Scientist, Fallujah, and more.

The guitars layer beautifully, with chunky riffs both alternating and occasionally layering beneath more melodic lines. The rhythm section pounds along, with a bass guitar that fleshes out instead of simply sitting at the root notes, even getting plenty of room to shine on its own (which I appreciate) and a drummer that can handle blistering double bass and blast beats right alongside jazzier sections. All the while we have a vocalist who manages to be perfectly understandable when he growls, by death metal standards anyway, without ever losing that sense of intensity and roughness.

One of the best things about (progressive) metal is that feeling of not knowing what to expect next. Sometimes it’s less enjoyable if it feels like the band doesn’t have a grip on what they’re doing and keep taking left turns to the mood, but once again Lunar succeeds by having each song feel like a distinct entity while never losing the tone of the album as a whole. After the two three “proper” songs (after the instrumental intro “Orbit”), the appropriately named “Comfort” comes in with a melodic and prog-rock/jazz inspired beginning, blossoming into a behemoth of a track that puts acoustic guitar and jazz drumming front and center forming a foundation and building to an explosion of a soothing guitar solo courtesy of Haken axeman Richard Henshall.

At this point you might think you’ve heard all of Lunar‘s arsenal, and you would be all wrong and a bag of chips. The very next track, “Potion,” is way more into the prog rock territory, with underlying acoustic guitar melody and jazz bassline carrying it.

The closing 12-minute epic “Your Long Awaited Void” is like a revue of all the best bits of the rest of the album: heavy riffs, clean vocals mixed with growls, acoustic bits, guitar soloing, in addition to cello-laden atmospherics,…

The word “classic” gets tossed around a lot, but I honestly can’t think of a better word for Eidolon. From front to back and top to bottom, this album is both firmly rooted in death metal with a progressive bend while standing alone atop the mountain. It’s equally headbang heavy and enthralling, music to get in the mosh pit and simply sit in awe of. This is required listening, because there’s nothing else quite like it.

Eidolon is out now and is available from Bandcamp. Check Lunar on Facebook and Instagram.

Premiere: LUNAR Launch New Single “Comfort” Featuring HAKEN’ Guitarist Richard Henshall

Sacramento based progressive metal project LUNAR are back with a new single from the sophomore studio album Eidolon, out on November 8th via Divebomb Records. Premiering today is animated video for “Comfort” which features guest appearance by Haken’s Richard Henshall, who laid down an enticing guitar solo. Watch the video below.

Alex Bosson, drummer and founder of LUNAR, commented:

I’m very excited to get to debut the song ‘Comfort’ from the new album.  Already, this early on, it seems to be a fan favorite. I think it has a good diversity with some aspects of pop, rock and, of course, metal and I think it turned out really well. Plus getting to have a guest solo by Rich Henshall of HAKEN is a big honor for me. The video was done by Miles Skarin of CRYSTAL SPOTLIGHT and he did such a phenomenal job! I hope everyone out there enjoys the song and the video as much as I do!

Alex_Bosson
Alex Bosson

LUNAR has been around since 2013. Bosson and guitarist/singer Ryan Erwin’s goal to create the genre-defiant music resulted in releases of a debut EP Provenance (2014) and a full-length album Theogony (2017).

In the Spring of 2018, Erwin unexpectedly passed away, but Bosson decided to continue on the project using this tragedy as an inspiration. The resulting release, Eidolon, is a concept album based around the cycle of life and death, and the stages of grief endured by those left behind. 

The core line-up besides Bosson features bassist Ryan Price and singer Chandler Mogel, who previously appeared on Theogony, in addition to NovaReign’s guitarist Balmore Lemus. Eidolon also includes guest contributions from members of Leprous, Haken, Caligula’s Horse, Fallujah, Thank You Scientist, among others.

Stream a video for “Comfort” below, and pre-order Eidolon from Bandcamp here.

Eidolon track listing:

  1. Orbit
  2. The Cycle Starts Again
  3. Surrender
  4. Comfort
  5. Potion
  6. Hypnotized
  7. Your Long Awaited Void

Lunar_Eidolon

 

Interview with MEMOREMAINS

Madonna certainly isn’t an artist that you would think of when it comes to metal music, yet many metalheads tend to cover the pop goddess’ songs. One of the recent additions to that camp is a Finnish metal band Memoremains who have covered “Sorry,” a song from Madonna’s 2005 album “Confessions on a Dance Floor.”

The group fronted by singer Johanna Ahonen answered our questions about their beginnings in music, the new single, and more.

Let’s start from your early music beginnings. How did your musical career begin? When did you start playing? Which groups have been your favorites? Please tell us something more about your early life.

Johanna: I think that I’ve been singing always, at least, as long as I remember. Singing has been a natural way for me to express my thoughts and feelings. I have performed ever since I was a child, mostly by myself and singing cover songs. Memoremains is the first actual band in which I’m involved. I always wanted to sing in a band and make own music so I can honestly say that Memoremains is the best thing that has happened to me!

Mikko: I’ve done songs for as long as I can remember. I have thousands of demos in my stock over many years. Music has been a part of my life for a really long time. I took my first contact with the piano sometime between the ages of 4 and 5 and drums and other rock instruments came along at around the age of 10.

Memoremains_band
Photo: Riku-Pekka Lappalainen

How did you go about starting Memoremains? Who was the most influential when the band started its musical journey?

Mikko: It’s really hard to determine who did what, because our band is really democratic. However, I had written the first songs of Memoremains before the band was born, so in a way it is possible to think that this is where our band was born. Eemeli and Aapo came along as old musician acquaintances. We found Johanna through an online announcement, just as we found Aleksi. Soon we were playing together and releasing our first song ‘We’re Not Alone.’

How would you describe Memoremains’ music on your own?

Our music is a combination of pop melodies, metal riffs and groovy disco beats. We’ve mixed together elements of different genres and created an own recognizable sound from them.

The new single is a cover of Madonna’s hit “Sorry.” How did you come to an idea to cover this song?

Mikko: Oh, it’s such a great song from the Queen of Pop. Unfortunately it has been forgotten from the general public during these years and we wanted to bring it back to life but in our style. Hopefully, people will find the song and listening to it takes them back to the last decade.

How difficult was it for you to shape this song and make it different than the original? Obviously, originally it is a pop song and you combine these elements with metal, but what would you say is the thing that separates your version from the original?

Mikko: It’s been a fun and creative job that we’ve been excited about. The first step was to internalize the song as our own, that is, to have it feel like our own song. Only through this can a functional cover be obtained. Once the song was thought to be our own, it was easy and fun to work with. But, strictly speaking, our version is faster, more energetic and heavier. However, we have retained the original song’s epic melodies.

What is the most important thing for the structure of your songs? Is it a riff, a melody line, vocal arrangement?

It really depends on which of those elements the song is created from. ‘Ballerina’ was born simply because it sounded like a good name for a song. “Time Is Running Out” was born from the melody of the chorus, and other parts of the song were built around it. In the end, though, the most important element of our music is addictive melodies and engaging rhythms. That’s where our sound comes from.

Recommend us some good metal acts coming from your area.

Mikko: There are so many great bands coming from Finland. We made a European tour together with Resolution 13 which is an alternative metal band from Helsinki. We’ve also been following Escalane, a band from middle-Finland, and their story. I need to bring up also a very original band, Awake Again, from Turku. On our tours abroad we have met many really awesome bands like Austrian Ardenite.

Memoremains live
Photo: Markus Soini

Are you also involved in any other projects or bands beside Memoremains?

Mikko: I play drums in a finnish language metal band called Riesa. The band name means like “ nuisance” or “annoyance”. Go and check it out!

Aleksi: I made own project with drummer Teemu Koski last year called “i Helvete”. It released two long songs and right now I am writing new ones. It is much darker and heavier than Memoremains. I also play bass in one another, unknown band.

So, what comes next for Memoremains?

We strive to make everything that happens even bigger. The goal is to make every release and tour bigger than the last one and there will also be more festivals.

Follow Memoremains on Facebook and Instagram.

 

Album Review: Parliament Owls – A Span Is All That We Can Boast

Parliament Owls, a quintet from Canada, have quite a challenge as with any new band playing this stylistically demanding music. They either need to add something exciting and original to the genre, or be so bloody good at delivering captivating rock (that visits quite a few genres) in its conventional form that they stand head and shoulders above the oceans of ordinariness that surround them. While they will not win any awards for innovation, the debut full-length release “A Span Is All That We Can Boast” does in fact rise most convincingly from the latter category, and has enough variation in its six tracks to keep interest levels high.

A Span Is All That We Can Boast

Beginning with “Cocobolo,” Parliament Owls expertly marry the math rock histrionics of The Dillinger Escape Plan to the noise rock sensibilities of Melvins. The band doesn’t joke about with long intros, and like to get on with the business at hand, with only one track clocking at almost seven minutes. This makes for a more urgent and also provides a much more organic feel to the band’s playing.

In addition to The Dillinger Escape Plan and Melvins you can undoubtedly hear the massive influence of Cult of Luna, Mono, Mastodon, Between the Buried and Me, all the major names, but Parliament Owls somehow manage to put a unique stamp on this rather derivative framework.

Parliament Owls have risen far above the sum of their influences, and delivered a very fine rock album. Check it out!

Follow Parliament Owls on Facebook.