Album Review: Devcord – Dysthymia

Devcord - Dysthymia

Dysthymia, the debut studio album from Spillern, Austria’s one-man band Devcord, is a roller coaster of aural delight, distress, and progressive imagery that is bound to be a career defining moment.

The nuanced atmospheres and melodic sensibilities that composer Peter Royburger brings to each of the nine songs on Dysthymia are nothing short of brilliant. As the lines blur between romantic-classical period music, progressive metal, and almost ‘70s style prog rock it becomes apparent that Dysthymia is one of the most progressively challenging albums to be released in 2018, so far.

Songs like the opening “The Mortician,” which has a dark, eerie intro and powerful guitar riffs that evolve into orchestral stabs of Royburger’s vocals, demonstrate the ease at which Devcord slips in and out of catchy hooks and technically sound orchestral song writing.

The discourse between the dueling guitars — acoustic and electric — places the listener into perfect attunement with the melodies and growl vocals. Dysthymia sounds like chaos tamed and controlled. This works to the project’s advantage on album highlights — the title track and especially “Reaper’s Helpers,” where Royburger is structurally coherent enough to be catchy yet throw enough curve balls to keep you invested for the full 10+ minutes. “Fade” and “Jerk Pitch Rape” that close the record are impressive on all fronts, but the instrumentation on these two pieces is splendid.

It is not only technically challenging and perfectly executed as a piece of musical literature, but it is also an album that demands the listener’s attention and ability to think on a multitude of spectrums they may not be used to. Overall, Dysthymia is an album that takes the listener on a cerebral journey through many mysterious and technically awe-inspiring landscapes that not so many groups are able to achieve.

Dysthymia is available from Bandcamp here

https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=2235363591/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/transparent=true/

The Return of NAO

After four years, North Atlantic Oscillation are back with new album Grind Show, due to hit the stores on 16 November. Pre-orders are being taken now.

the album represents a dramatic shift into more accessible territory: pop, electronica, rock and even folk elements combine to form a vibrant, multicoloured record that is still imbued with NAO’s trademark sonic restlessness.

Review: Dystopia – Building Bridges

Dystopia

Hungarian quartet Dystopia are here to assault your senses with their unique mixture of heavy, modern and groove metal. With some obvious influences from Pantera, Lamb of God, and Gojira, Dystopia was formed in 2004. With two full-length albums under their belt, Dystopia is back once again and excited to launch their third full-length album, Building Bridges which was released on July 12, 2018.

It’s the snarling groove that first gains the attention on Dystopia’s beast. “Free-Fall” has some meaty riffs and a deceptive level of groove running through it. It’s an opener that makes a hell of a statement.

Dystopia - Building Bridges

Breathing fire and brimstone, Dystopia smash their way through track after track slipping effortlessly through ferocious modern metal, alternative and classic flourishes of traditional heavy metal. An album that surprises as much as it delights. 

For most of the album’s run it does a great job of keeping your attention. Anytime the mind does begin to wander, Dystopa stamp hard on feet to get all attention back on them. Those who are willing to allow their musical perceptions be challenged will be heavily rewarded, and will most certainly regard Building Bridges as a truly special album.

Hear it on Bandcamp. Connect with Dystopia on Facebook.

Burning Shed News (September 20, 2018)

 


King Crimson

Vinyl Box Sets (box set pre-orders)


King Crimson 1969-1972 and King Crimson 1972-1974 are limited edition box sets presenting the band’s seven studio albums from 1969-1974 in their 40th anniversary edition mixes (by Steven Wilson and Robert Fripp).

1969-1972 also includes a double LP of rarities and a full-sized replica of the original King Crimson timeline booklet which accompanied The Young Person’s Guide to King Crimson.

1972-1974 contains a fourth album featuring a complete alternate version of Larks’ Tongues in Aspic – mixed and produced by Steven Wilson and featuring the LP’s original US artwork – plus the expanded edition of USA (in its 2013 mix by Robert Fripp, David Singleton and Tony Arnold). The set also contains a full-sized 24 page photographic booklet of the band during the period plus a poster of the King Crimson album art as it originally featured in The Young Person’s Guide to King Crimson.

All albums are cut from the same hi-res masters used for the 40th anniversary CD/DVD-A series, pressed on 200g super-heavyweight vinyl, and presented in their original sleeves.

Pre-order CD 1969-1972 for 2nd November release and 1972-1974 for 23rd November release. A bundle of both boxes is available for 23rd November combined shipping.

Continue reading “Burning Shed News (September 20, 2018)”

Obviously, You’re Not a Golfer: Progarchy’s Third Interview with The Duda (aka Mariusz)

It wouldn’t be an understatement to say Mariusz Duda, or as he known around here, The Duda, has been a busy man.  Between last year and this, he’s put out not one, but two Lunatic Soul albums.  In addition, he’s been busy with his day job, recording and preparing the new Riverside album, Wasteland, which is out September 28th.  And then, of course, touring which will be upcoming soon.  Recently, we caught up with The Duda, talking to him for the third time at this site.  Topics included the concept and inspiration behind the new album, recording as a trio for the first time, various instrumentation used on the album, and why he effing hates The Eagles, man.  Press_Photos_05

[Note: It’s possible that I completely made up the thing about him hating The Eagles]

[Note 2: And by possible, I mean 100% absolute metaphysical certainty]

Ok, so let’s get on with it now.

—————————————————————————————————————————–

Progarchy: What made you decide to do an album about surviving in a post-apocalyptic world?

Mariusz Duda:  First and foremost, the story is what I always wanted to write about but never had the occasion to until the end of the world happened in Riverside.  I thought that OK, if I choose this subject, it will be multi-dimensional to have many layers, and pretty symbolic stuff, so I chose this you know.  This is a story about survivors, about the end of the world, and the people who survive the end of the world.  But it’s also connected with the situation in the band, and the situation all around the world, because we live in uncertain times.  For some people, Wasteland might be like Poland or something, so I thought I would do that kind of subject now.

Continue reading “Obviously, You’re Not a Golfer: Progarchy’s Third Interview with The Duda (aka Mariusz)”

Motörhead Sunday

From the movie Airheads:

Chazz: Who’d win in a wresting match? Lemmy or God?
Chris: Lemmy.
Chris: … God?
Rex: Wrong, ********. Trick question. Lemmy *IS* God.

Was at this technical death metal show yesterday, headlined by Obscura, Beyond Creation and Archspire. In short, the most tortuously intricate sounds on the planet, playing back to back at one venue. A sonic feast. But, before tech death, thrash metal, and even before first wave of black metal, there was Motörhead.

When blues based psychedelic and space rock collided with punk riffs, it sparked an uncontrollable causal chain. So dissonant that it consumed the whole planet. Motörhead is probably what they might have termed as extreme metal in the 70s — combining that elegance of Jimi Hendrix with some distracting discordance. Rooted in blues, but playing the riffs loud enough to keep the dainties at a safe distance — essentially crafting that first clear cross-over from proto-punk to metal. In other words, Lemmy accomplished that seemingly impossible task – fusion of polar opposites – of molten lava with freezing ice – of harsh punk sensibilities with elegance of electric blues.