Rush on the Web: “Rush is a Band” and “Power Windows”

If you’ve had a chance to look at our blog roll, you’ll see a couple of Rush sites.  In particular, I’d like to point out RUSHISABAND and POWERWINDOWS.  Let me just be blunt–I think the world of these sites.  I love the spirit they bring to the internet, and I deeply admire the men (Ed Stenger and Eric Hansen, respectively) who run each.

When we–Carl, Chris, and Kevin–founded progarchy back in 2012, I (Brad) really had three sites in mind to emulate: the Dutch Progressive Rock Page, Rush is a Band, and Power Windows.

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Rush is a Band

Frankly, I wanted to do for Big Big Train what the latter two have done for Rush.

Continue reading “Rush on the Web: “Rush is a Band” and “Power Windows””

Dave Kerzner’s Supergroup: In Continuum.

Received this excellent news from Dave today.  Very excited for Dave and all involved.  He’s on fire.  Run, Dave, run!–BB


Dave Kerzner Announces New Progressive Rock Supergroup, “In Continuum”

Monday, March 19th, 2018, Miami, Florida: American musician, songwriter, producer, sound designer, co-founder of the band Sound of Contact and lauded progressive-rock artist Dave Kerzner, has announced the birth of a new progressive rock super-group named “In Continuum”. The band consists of Kerzner at the helm as the main songwriter and keyboardist, sharing lead vocal duties with Gabriel Agudo (Steve Rothery Band / Bad Dreams).

Joining Kerzner and Agudo on the debut album – set for release later in 2018 – are top multi-instrumentalists Matt Dorsey (Sound of Contact) and Randy McStine (Sound of Contact, The Fringe), former Porcupine Tree and Sound of Contact touring guitarist John Wesley, drummers Nick D’Virgilio (Big Big Train, Spock’s Beard) and Derek Cintron along with guitarist Fernando Perdomo from the Dave Kerzner Band. Special guests on the album will include singer Jon Davison (Yes) and guitarist Steve Rothery (Marillion).

Continue reading “Dave Kerzner’s Supergroup: In Continuum.”

Organic Hallucinosis

“I remember when I first heard DECAPITATED’s ‘Organic Hallucinosis’ and it just blew me away!!!!”–Tomas Haake, from MESHUGGAH. This was in the context of Vitek’s unfortunate death, at the age of 23.

Importance of Decapitated cannot be exaggerated. Intensity aside, that layered combination of rhythm, leads and complex drumming pattern is absolutely devastating. Whether it’s “Day 69”, “Post(?) Organic” or the intricately progressive “A Poem About an Old Prison Man” – Organic Hallucinosis shifts technical death into even more demanding musical terrains. And Decapitated accomplishes that by largely remaining rooted in old school structures.

Extending the scope of an already established genre mandates more than just musical skill – a broader grasp of the context is equally crucial. Essentially, Decapitated captures those alien progressive tendencies into the same old confines of tried and tested death framework. Needless to say, it’s a surgical balancing act. Sheer progressive melody brewed into old school death — and without many deviations from the genre playbook. In short, Organic Hallucinosis is a ruthless exhibition of musical and aesthetic craftsmanship, and undoubtedly a masterful swan song too.

Vitek (R.I.P. 2007)

By Selbymay (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

soundstreamsunday #103: “Every Hungry Woman” by the Allman Brothers Band

Allmans1Southern Rock’s manifesto is like no other rock album.  The Allman Brothers Band, released in November 1969, carries a hard sonic power absent from its closest temporal and spiritual brother, the Band’s Music from Big Pink (1968), and tight, sharp-cornered riffing missing from the work of the Grateful Dead, who the Allmans resembled in their two-drummer, double guitar form and in their tendency to stretch out in live performance.  Mostly, though, the group had the brothers themselves: Duane, a guitar sharpshooter whose session work had honed his chops — including a wicked slide technique — to a razor’s edge; and Gregg, whose organ playing and lyric writing demonstrated a finesse far beyond his 21 years, and whose voice was a soulful, ragged howl coming from a place of honest truth.  In an era when the integrity of white blues bands was, rightfully, beginning to be questioned, along with the plantation politics of the music industry, no one, not even Lester Bangs, argued with the Allman Brothers Band’s authenticity or the singular chords they struck, as they effortlessly crossed over into country and jazz, articulating a maturing musical vision for the American South.  That they were an integrated band was interesting (in 1969 much of Georgia, the Allman’s home base, still segregated its schools), but it was what underpinned that fact that made their music ascend: a fascination with next steps, set against a background of a changing rock vocabulary, so that every member of the band was important.  While Duane and Gregg receive much of the attention as the band’s geniuses (and they were), guitarist Dickey Betts’s influence on the band, particularly his use of the major pentatonic scale, went a long way towards defining the Southern Rock sound, while the rhythm section of Berry Oakley, Jai Johanny Johanson, and Butch Trucks provided a propulsive force but also a lithe one, booty shaking, more akin to what Carlos Santana was putting together on the west coast than anything coming out of the blues or country scenes of the time.

Paraphrasing the Rolling Stone Record Guide‘s review of the Allman’s Live at Fillmore East (1971), even when the band went long form, when they jammed, there weren’t any wasted notes.  At a scant 33 minutes, the Allmans’ first album is similarly lean, a killer hard rock set that proved to be less of a template than an opening salvo (1970’s Idlewild South shows voracious growth, as does 1972’s Eat a Peach, Duane’s death notwithstanding).  While “Dreams” and “Whipping Post” are the album’s jaw-dropping closers, this is a record with no filler whatsoever.  “Every Hungry Woman” is a favorite, metal crunch up against slide guitar sirens, organ moans, and an epic swamp beast of a riff.  The dueling guitars in the solo section say more in their few seconds than many bands say across a career, and Gregg’s roar channels some deep beast that must’ve drunk from the same watering hold as Ray Charles and Charley Patton.  Inimitable.

soundstreamsunday presents one song or live set by an artist each week, and in theory wants to be an infinite linear mix tape where the songs relate and progress as a whole. For the complete playlist, go here: soundstreamsunday archive and playlist, or check related articles by clicking on”soundstreamsunday” in the tags section.

“Irish” Symphony — The Imaginative Conservative

Editor’s Note: Arthur Sullivan began writing what would be his only symphony when he was twenty-one years old, on a trip to Ireland, the native land of his father. “The other night as I was jolting home,” he wrote to his mother from Belfast, “through the wind and rain on an open jaunting car, the…

via “Irish” Symphony — The Imaginative Conservative

BRIAN WILSON brings Pet Sounds to Cropredy 2018 — The Rockin’ Chair

Fairport’s Cropredy Convention 2018 is proud to announce that headlining our festival this year we welcome the legendary Brian Wilson. A Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee and recipient of the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement, Brian Wilson is one of popular music’s most revered figures, the main creative force behind some of the most […]

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