The Edge — Live at the Sistine Chapel

On May 1, U2’s The Edge made history by rocking the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel with Leonard Cohen’s “If It Be Your Will,” as well as U2 songs “Yahweh,” “Ordinary Love,” and “Walk on.”

Some grouches are upset that The Edge broke the rules by singing “Yahweh” (a name you’re not supposed to say out loud).

Hey, dudes, if so, still, maybe it was God’s will?

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Politics in Rock: U2 and Rush

u2 war album cover
1983.  One of the most political rock albums of all time.  And, thank God.

I want to thank Bryan, Craig, and Nick for such a civilized discussion regarding politics and art.  I also want to thank the many commentators who joined in.

I only have a personal, autobiographical, inward-looking comment.  I grew up in an extremely anti-war, pro-Catholic, libertarian household.  I’m deeply thankful to my mom, my aunts, my maternal grandmother, and the Dominican nuns for teaching me that EVERY SINGLE HUMAN LIFE (regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, skin tone, etc.) matters.

Life is precious, and the good life is even more so.

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Arrived at Progarchy This Week

Lots of good stuff–old, new, redone–arrived at progarchy hq this week.  Not bad.  Not bad at all.

In no particular order:

Aronora, the new project by Ben Cameron.  The album: Escapology.

aronora

New Order, Brotherhood (collector’s edition)

NEW-ORDER-BROTHERHOOD-COLLECTORS-EDITION-L825646936991

XTC, Nonsuch (the Steven Wilson remix version)

nonsuch xtc 2013

ABC, The Lexicon of Love  (deluxe edition)

abc lexicon of love

Neal Morse, Neal Morse (Morse’s first solo album)

neal morse

Mayfield, Mayfield (Curt Smith’s side band)

a0031168066_10

U2, War (deluxe edition)

u2 war

AndersonPonty Band, Better Late than Never

andersonponty

Remember 1992? The Cure or Dream Theater as the Future of Prog?

For me, the only great thing to come out of the Mike Portnoy/NHS controversy (which doesn’t seem like it should have been a controversy, at least to this American) was that it re-awakened my interest in Portnoy’s time in Dream Theater. I’ve followed him almost religiously in his non-DT efforts (Transatlantic, Neal Morse Band, Flying Colors), and I think the world of him—as a person and as a drummer. Yeah, he’s got a bit of a temper—but he seems to let it run wild only when life calls for it to run wild. I can’t really blame him. Plus, the guy is so outstanding in what he does, I can’t help but admire him. I would give a lot to have his restraint, frankly.

dt images words
The first prog metal album, IMAGES AND WORDS.

But, my point in this post is not about that “controversy.” Instead, that moment in England caused me to pull out all of my Portnoy-era Dream Theater, 1992. I’m not what you’d call an intense fan of Dream Theater, but I have purchased every single album (studio, live, ep) as it’s has come out since IMAGES AND WORDS.

When I first got IMAGES AND WORDS, I was impressed with it. I listened to it with fervor, but, even then, I really loved side two and I really didn’t love side one.

Remember 1992?

1992 was a great year for music, but it was an uncertain year for prog.

cure wish
Half prog (in a Traffic kind of way), half wacky pop. WISH.

At the time, The Cure’s WISH seemed as likely a candidate for inheriting the mantle of prog as did Dream Theater’s IMAGES AND WORDS. In hindsight, it’s easy to give the award to Dream Theater, but not so easy in 1992. Go back and listen to “From the Edge of the Deep Green Sea,” but also listen to “Open,” “Cut,” “To Wish Impossible Things,” and “End.” There’s a LOT of prog on that Cure album. Plus, I would consider DISINTEGRATION a prog album. My point: if you listened to Dream Theater (metal prog) and The Cure (pop prog), it was impossible to determine who was more prog.  At least in 1992.

Add the albums from Phish, Pearl Jam, and U2 that year.

A lot could’ve happened.

Well, here we are 23 years later. Thanks, Mike. You paved the way then and you continue to do so.

Charge of the Dad Brigade

Neil McCormick surveys the reality:

“Fans are extremely loyal, and they love hearing new versions of old stuff. In fact, a lot of people would rather listen to that than a new album. Remarkable, really.”

But, let’s face it, an industry with a business model that depends on selling an ageing audience something that they already own is in big trouble. Thankfully, not every veteran is relying on their back catalogue. Neil Young and AC/DC have new albums on the schedules. And in the usual scheme of things Irish rock superstars U2 might have been expected to boost the Christmas sales with their new album, but instead they gave it away free on iTunes. Explaining their motives, Bono said “the charts are broken”. He has a point.

UK album sales have been in decline for most of the 21st century, down last year to a meagre 94 million from a 2004 peak of 163 million. CDs still account for nearly 80 per cent of those sales, although there are kids obsessively listening to music now who wouldn’t know what a CD was if you broke it over their heads.

Meanwhile, streaming services such as Spotify and YouTube are rapidly expanding, claiming worldwide listening numbers in the billions. These are forums where you can access music without actually owning it. To put it in perspective, U2’s 1987 album The Joshua Tree sold more than 25 million copies in the course of its lifetime. But U2’s Songs of Innocence has already been downloaded free more than 26 million times and actually listened to by more than 80 million iTunes users. By most criteria, you would have to call that a hit. But it only reached number six in the UK sales charts.

U2 have effectively opted to put their music where the majority of listeners might actually find it. The bigger point is that just because older fans still want to feel a physical object in their hands, it would be a mistake to think this means that oldies are taking over pop. The truth is, the kids are just having a different kind of conversation in an era of big pop singles, where individual tracks accessed online are all that really matters.

But you can’t put a download or a stream in a Christmas stocking.











U2’s creative holding pattern in a thumotic genre

Perhaps it is Dan Flynn who wrote the best review of U2’s Songs of Innocence:

Songs of Innocence follows the creative holding pattern that began after Pop ventured too far from the mainstream for the stalwarts there from the raw-rock beginnings of Boy. It reminds listeners of the back catalogue, which may be the point.

Conclusion? This isn’t U2 but a robot tribute act playing Coldplay playing U2. Surely the busker bazillionaires, particularly the world saver on vocals, can no longer spare the time for mere music.

Still, if it’s worse than U2 past, it’s better than radio present. “Song for Everyone,” an acoustic ballad that builds into a soaring anthem, deserves to knock Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj, and Justin Bieber off the airwaves, even if for four minutes. And if it fails in that noble mission, it will at least serve as the soundtrack for when the twelve-pack becomes a one-pack. “If there is a dark/within and without/There is a light/don’t let it go out.”

Guys in their fifties generally fail to match the artistic output of their twenties in as thumotic a genre as rock ’n’ roll. Songs of Innocence isn’t Unforgettable Fire, Joshua Tree, or Achtung! Baby. But it isn’t exactly post-Tattoo You, phone-it-in Rolling Stones, either. U2 on an off day hits the ears better than no U2 at all. And with fans thirsty for a drink after five dry years, going back to the well works well enough to satiate. Listeners get more than their money’s worth at the price.

U2 keeps making the same album. … There’s a payday in safely playing like the heyday.