Glass Hammer, “The Dreaming City” @GlassHammerProg

This new track from Glass Hammer is freakin’ awesome…

Don’t miss their amazing new disc Dreaming City, to be released during Easter Week (and now shipping).

If you loved Chronomonaut, then this new album is definitely also for you.

Man, I totally loved Chronomonaut, and in my review I pronounced it their finest album ever.

Glass Hammer amazes by constantly taking things to a whole new level with each new album.

The heaviness promised on Dreaming City thrills my prog metal heart, so stay tuned and get ready to rock 2020 with me at maximum volume…

Bob Dylan: “Murder Most Foul”

What the fork?? Bob Dylan releases a song 17 minutes long… “Murder Most Foul“… Holy prog, Batman!

BTW: You can assemble the original “Blood on the Tracks” from “More Blood, More Tracks”: select tracks 69 (CD5, No.3), 71 (CD5, No.5), 34 (CD3, No.3), 76 (CD5, No.10), 48 (CD4, No.2), 16 (CD2, No.5), 11 (CD1, No.11), 59 (CD4, No.13), 46 (CD3, No.15), & 58 (CD4, No.12).

Get ready for @WhiteCrone on 22/02/2020!

Great sounding tracks below from White Crone!

No hype, definitely as advertised: ‘White Crone’s The Poisoner delivers Traditional Heavy Metal, with traces of prog, proto & doom. Featuring soaring Dickinsonian female vocals, epic dual guitars, thunderous drums & (most especially) iron-fisted bass guitar, The Poisoner will take you “back to the day.”‘

Neil Peart marched to his own beat of faith

neilpeartFrom my tribute to Neil Peart, a focus on his lyrics and their spiritual journey:

Fly by Night (1975) was Peart’s first album with Rush. The title track buoyantly celebrates the sense of adventure that should characterize life: “Start a new chapter / Find what I’m after / It’s changing every day.”

But on Caress of Steel (also 1975), with the track “I Think I’m Going Bald,” Peart grapples with mortality: “My life is slipping away / I’m aging every day / But even when I’m grey / I’ll still be grey my way.”

This independent ethos assumed mythical form on 2112 (Rush’s breakthrough hit album of 1976), which depicts a dystopian sci-fi future where a totalitarian priesthood bans guitar music and tries to bring the story’s hero under its total control.

On A Farewell to Kings (1977), the magnificent song “Xanadu” retells the story of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem “Kubla Khan.” Peart depicts the emptiness that results when one is devoted solely to a life of pleasure: “Waiting for the world to end / Weary of the night / Praying for the light.”

Hemispheres (1978) contains “The Trees,” a memorable parable from Peart about a war between oaks and maples. The terrifying twist ending shows the violent cost of egalitarian revolution: “Now there’s no more oak oppression / For they passed a noble law / And the trees are all kept equal / By hatchet, axe, and saw.”

Although aware of humanity’s evil tendencies, Peart’s humane optimism bursts through in “Jacob’s Ladder,” from Permanent Waves (1980): “Follow men’s eyes / As they look to the skies / The shifting shafts of shining / Weave the fabric of their dreams.”

On the jubilant “Limelight” from Moving Pictures (1981), Peart clings to hope for life lived to the fullest, despite the obstaces presented by social convention: “Those who wish to be / Must put aside the alienation / Get on with the fascination.”

The album Signals (1982) laments those who “sell their dreams for small desires,” in the song “Subdivisions,” which makes the mass-production building zones of suburbia into a metaphor for social conformity: “Subdivisions / In the basement bars / In the backs of cars / Be cool or be cast out.”

Grace Under Pressure (1984) contains the haunting song “Afterimage” about the death of a friend: “Suddenly, you were gone / From all the lives you left your mark upon.”

It’s a testimony to the impact of Neil Peart that so many people felt such a blow from his death.

Music gives shape to our lives as we reflect along with it in our private interior dialogues. Peart was a conversation partner for many in this inner world.

Although he was agnostic in public, yet always “looking for an open door” (as he put it), perhaps the hope and joy he did discover in life may have enabled him to find his way in the end.

Pure Reason Revolution release ‘Eupnea’ on April 3

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Pure Reason Revolution announce Eupnea — their first studio album in nearly 10 years!

Last year, Jon Courtney and Chloë Alper reunited the much-loved Pure Reason Revolution, playing their first show in close to eight years at Midsummer Prog Festival and performing their debut album The Dark Third in full. Today they are excited to announce the release of Eupnea, their first new studio album in nearly 10 years, for the 3rd of April 2020.